What do the grandmas cook in the Far East? (pt. 1)

May 19, 2019

Chicago Downtown incall (5/22)

 

 



Most of you already know about my love for Japanese culture and cooking so in between all the traveling that I’m bless to do as a Chicago GFE escort I spent the small time at home trying new Japanese dishes! Now despite loving fish (just like our Far East neighbors), their preparations of the sea creatures is quite different from what I’m use to. Also, their seafood doesn’t instantly refers to crabs, shrimp, lobster, and salmon like us. My American palette did not see what was coming when the various taste of Nippon seafood and dessert hit my tongue. I learned this immediately with the making of takoyaki, okonomiyaki, and taiyaki.

When I hear soul food (especially near Easter) my mind goes to cabbage, candy yams, HOME-MADE baked Mac and Cheese, corn beard dressing, etc but I’m not a narcissist; I know soul food isn’t the same everywhere. However, it still did not stop me from being humor at how....healthier Japanese soul food can be.

Disclaimer: Now before you foodies come down my thrust(in a bad way), I know Southern soul food contain quite a bit of vegetables but I have ran into a Japanese dish that requires covering the vegetable with sugar like making candy yams and greens.

So back on topic, I was intrigue with Japan’s spin on “soul food” so why not try some of their popular dishes, okonomiyaki, and takoyaki. The term root “yaki” means “grill” and you can’t go wrong with grill!

 

 



(From my twitter account )

Okonomiyaki

This was a fun dish to make and by “fun” I mean a reminder that cooking is a skill. There are two ways of making okonomiyaki, Osaka style or Hiroshima style. I have chosen the latter. It contains less batter, more cabbage, and a lot more technique required. You’re basically flipping your crepe over and over again as you add more and more layers. Watch as the impressively tall tower diminish in height as the veggies dehydrated was fun but it was spoiled when I allowed the noodle layer to become too crispy. Regardless, this is a dish I would definitely make again!

Despite it being known as a “savory pancake”, I see it more as a pizza. Vision it, the crepe and noodle layer as the crust, the egg, pork belly, and cabbage as topping, and the okonomiyaki sauce and Japanese mayo as the tomato sauce. Hey. I’m from Chicago, so a thick pizza doesn’t scare me!

Such an unexpected pair of ingredients but you can replace or add vegetables and meat if your choice hence the name “cook as you like”!

 

 

 

 








 

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